The Squares of London

David sheds light on “London’s principal contribution to the urban experiment.”

One response to “The Squares of London”

  1. Sandra Hüwels says:

    Dear David,
    I really enjoyed the podcast about the ‘Squares of London’.
    10 years ago my family moved into a beautiful Victorian flat in Bramham Gardens at Earls Court. When Brexit came, they decided to leave London and to move to Berlin. Bad luck for me!
    So what should we do with the apartment? With the end of the free movement it would be very unlikely that any of us could live there again. The decision to keep the flat was not made because of the really beautiful flat, the deciding factor was the wonderful garden. It would have broken our hearts to give up the key to this paradise with probably the oldest trees in London Square.
    Contrary to your experiences it is a real social meeting place. You will find your neighbours walking their dogs, some reading the newspaper on one of the benches, everyone having a good time. I know more neighbours there than I have ever known in my street in Düsseldorf.
    During the lockdown when it was not possible to meet there, some of the neighbours, all of them extremely talented artists, organized concerts and readings. The whole neighbourhood sat on their balconies and listened to the music from the opera, from a musical, a story by Dickens or a very special poem.
    These incredible events took place on every Thursday evening after giving thanks to the NHS. I understand for many it was the highlight of the week in a very demanding time.
    So I fully agree with you that all the green hiding places are the essence of the allure of this absolutely liveable city.

    Thanks again to you and all your fantastic colleagues who make it so easy for me to spend some time at home in a time when travel is absolutely unpredictable. If only from afar.

    I really hope to see you all again very soon.
    Sandra

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